I spent $20 on new toys.

I had $20 to spend on new toys. How much did each toy cost?  How much change did I get? 

(Show the hardest solutions you can)

0.5

1.0

1.25

1.5

1.75

2.0

2.25

2.5

2.75

3.0

3.25

3.5

3.75

4.0

Use of one-to-one correspondence and numbers 1 to 10 when counting.

Can count 10 counters.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

They use materials to model addition and subtraction by the aggregation (grouping together) and disaggregation (moving apart) of objects.

They add and subtract by counting forward and backward using the numbers from 0 to 20 on a number line or 100’s chart..

Students count the size of small sets using the numbers 0 to 20.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Drawing of diagrams to show subtraction activities.

 

Use of written number sentences to summarise addition.

 

Calculation of the next number when asked to add 1 or 2 to any natural number from 0 to 10.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Counting by 2s, 5s and 10s from 0 to a given target: for example, 5+5+5+5= 20

Addition and subtraction of two-digit multiples of ten by counting on and counting back. (10+10).

Counting on from the larger of two collections to find their total.

Recognition of complements to ten; for example, 3 + 4 + 7 + 6 = 3 + 7 + 4 + 6 = 10 + 10 = 20

 

Addition and subtraction of numbers less than 10 using recall of number facts.

 

Development and use of a 'fact family' linking          25 + 5 = 30 to                     5 + 25 = 30,                30 − 5 = 25 and               30 − 25 = 5

They mentally compute simple addition and subtraction calculations involving one- or two-digit natural numbers, using number facts such as complements to 10 (8+2), doubles (8+8) and near doubles(8+9).

They add and subtract one-and two-digit numbers by counting on and counting back.

Students describe and calculate simple multiplication as repeated addition, such as 4 × 5 =       5 + 5 +5 + 5; and division as sharing, such as 20 shared between 5.

 

Use of strategies such as ‘near doubles’, ‘adding 9’ and ‘build up to next 10’ to solve addition and subtraction problems.

 

Use of money as a model for grouping and unpacking lots of 10s.($20 = $10 + $10)

 

Use of ‘=’ to indicate equivalence or the result of a computation

 

Use of written number sentences such as 20 ÷ 4 = 5 to summarise sharing (partition) and ‘how many?’ (quotition) processes

Use of written methods for whole number problems of addition and subtraction involving numbers up to 99

Addition and subtraction of amounts of money including calculation of change from $10. (using cents)

Calculations using notation such as  ‘3 + 5 − 2 =’

 

Addition and subtraction of numbers to two decimal places.

 

Use of fact families    (5 × 4 = 20, 20 ÷ 4 = 5) to solve division problems

They devise and use algorithms for the addition and subtraction of numbers to two decimal places, including situations involving money.

 

They use number properties in combination to facilitate computations (for example, 7 + 10 + 3 = 10 + 7 + 3 = 10 + 10).

 

Students apply number skills to everyday contexts such as shopping, with appropriate rounding to the nearest five cents.

 

They add and subtract simple common fractions with the assistance of physical models.

 

Appropriate selection and use of mental and written algorithms to add, subtract, multiply and divide (by single digits) natural numbers.

 

Use of brackets to determine order of operations

 

 

Students explain and use mental and written algorithms for the addition, subtraction, multiplication and division of natural numbers (positive whole numbers).

 

They add, subtract, and multiply fractions and decimals (to two decimal places) and apply these operations in practical contexts, including the use of money.

 

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